Melbourne Masterclass: Turning Points in Cinema to Die For

Cancelled
Melbourne Masterclass: Turning Points in Cinema to Die For

The Faculty of Arts regrets to announce that this program has been cancelled. Please be in touch should you have any questions at all about this change: brittany.wilkins@unimelb.edu.au

Session Four: Blow-Up, Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966, presented by Kelly Gellatly

The Turning Points in Cinema to Die For series illustrates the profound and enduring impact of cinema on the lives of six Melbourne scholars, critics and artists. Each of our speakers has chosen a beloved film that represents a turning point in their professional and personal experience, and inspired a new understanding of the world and their place in it.

Evocatively capturing the excitement, fashion, music, and new sexual freedoms of Swinging London in the 1960s, Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up was described by film critic Arthur Knight at the time as having the ability to become as "important and germinal a film as Citizen Kane, Open City and Hiroshima, Mon Amour – perhaps even more so." Starring David Hemmings as a free-wheeling fashion photographer and with cameos by some of the 1960s most influential players, Blow-Up encapsulates and embodies many of the seminal shifts in photographic practice that occurred during this decade, and the rise of the cult of celebrity.

Kelly Gellatly is the Director of the Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne.

Turning Points in Cinema to Die For is hosted by Dr Mark Nicholls, Senior Lecturer in Cinema Studies at The University of Melbourne.

All films featured in the series have a history of significant audience and critical appeal. Above all, the films have distinguished themselves for their ability to reach out to and influence creative and performing artists and audiences well beyond the realms of the movie business. Studied together, they make up a new and refreshingly eclectic set of films to add to your essential viewing list. Join us in the discussion with our experts as they reveal why these are not only films to see before you die, but films to die for.

Cost:
Individual session: $55* / $65
Series Pass: $300* / $350
*University of Melbourne alumni, staff, and students

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